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richard nixon and jfk. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i would hope he would grant me the same. the question is which point of view, and which party do we want to lead the united states. >> mr. nixon would you like to comment on that statement? >> i have no comment. >> cenk: the people who listened on the radio, thought nixon had one, but the people watching it on tv thought kennedy won. it appeared that the debate swung the election in favor of kennedy. ever since then people have put a tremendous amount of weight on the debates. because of that everybody plays the expectations game. what is funny here is all of the republicans are saying oh my god, obama is going to win. >> mitt romney has the advantage because he has been through 20 of these debates. >> mitt romney is a business guy, and hasn't had a debate against a democrat in overten years. >> mitt romney is just in practice. >> having been through this much more recently than president obama, i think he starts with an advantage. >> i think barack obama will be formidable. >> but i have ne
nixon the first person i turned to was cindy quinn who -- i was 20 at the time when i took over the library. sandy was 30. we have grown up together around the library. it's a wonderful to be back. i'm glad you mentioned my friend his book will be a tremendous best seller. so if you have a chance come back. he is in fact performing in memphis the weekend after next. he has a great role in memphis which will be at the pantages. a brilliant and wonderful speaker. come out to hear him. we've been friends since we were too. rao the city to the other radio in los angeles. like to point out that we're all graduates of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and comm
between nixon and kennedy. >> that was a very -- >> the actual camera. >> love actually you come in to cbs news here in new york and we have art facts every where. they are all over this new set. >> it's a museum out there. >> i was thinking about it. that debate was an interesting one. it was like did you watch it or did you hear it? if you watched it -- >> had a very different perception. >> very different. >> shows how the candidates handle pressure. is this the way i want to see the demeanor of my leader and it's credited with putting kennedy to the white house that debate because nixon had a lead at the time. >> nixon would argue he had a lead all along. that's another story. he would say the election -- that's another story. three debates, of course, first one. a lot of people think this is the most important one. we'll talk about the big debate moments over the last elections. stick with us. you're watching cbs "this morning saturday" and we'll be back with a look at the debates and how you win and how you lose on the big night. >> i got some ideas on,000 win. >> really? >> i don't
-- for example, think about president reagan, he was running against the catastrophic effects of nixon's wage on price controls lasting up to 1980 and carter. the "new york times," i have to remind you, the "new york times" on the eve of the election between reagan and carter had it too close to call. lou: the third debate? >> that is right. lou: i know it's right. up next, governor romney trailing in the polls, but does history show come from behind wins are possible? as we disused, there -- discussed, there is history here. we'll have the report. are taxpayer dollars -- they call it art, but looks like obscenity to me, but there we are. we'll look at the ways in which the obama administration expresses religious sensitivity and tolerance and other ways in which had does not seem to give much of a damn. we'll talk about catth catholic league president, bill don hue and karen handle here in just moments. with all the opinions about stocks out there, how do you know which ones to follow? the equity summary score consolidates the ratings of up to 10 independent research providers into a single
. >> oops. >> forgetting is bad, and looking bad is bad. in the very first tv debate, richard nixon refused to put on makeup. it hurt him. nixon later said -- >> more important than what you say is how you look on television. >> so campaigns obsess over details. when ronald reagan debated walter mondale, rollins and beckel were the opposing campaign managers. >> do you remember how high the podiums would be? >> days. >> we had days negotiating. >> the color of the room. >> what difference would it make to the candidate what color the room was? >> because in certain conditions, certain colors work for certain candidates. >> because mondale was shorter than reagan -- >> we wanted more distance between the two podiums. we debated between 7 1/2 feet and 9 feet for a day and a half. >> the first debate came, and reagan struggled. >> 2/3 of the defense budget pays for pay and salary -- or pay and passengers. >> he looked tired and ragged. the general observation was they just spent too much time with a 70-year-old guy trying to beat every factoid into his brain. >> people said ronald reagan is t
victory for president lyndon johnson, richard nixon got a landslide victory in 1972, but a landslide democratic majority in the house and senate and let us not forget a supreme court of the united states that was still fairly and the control of liberal democrats. 4 two brief shining years or perhaps baleful years if you don't like the great society but for two years for better or for worse the united states had a government in the way that we often seek of her majesty, having a government that is a group of people who can implement a party platform that can be judged at the next election or serious elections. that is not generally the way the united states operates. courtesy of the constitution drafted in 1787 and what i want to in sister relatively unamended thereafter with regard to the basic structures we live under. the republican president, president johnson, nixon, ford, reagan and george h. w. bush not for a single day had even a single house of congress from their own political party. ronald reagan did have the senate for four years but he never had a full congress that was r
>> what is burning a's relationship right now with empire, nixon, burlap? how has that evolved over time, do you have twitter set up with them? >> we have been out there for 20 years. we know the folks out there. we have a ranch there where we used to stage our event. we brought it -- we bought property in the community. derleth, nevada is a tiny place. the empire you mentioned, that is a neighboring town which does not exist anymore. it was a classic company town. usgs cut their losses in sheet rock and closed down. it is gone. the houses are there but the people are gone. it is the real wild west, the way it was. it takes a lot of the romance out of it. so we have done several things. black rock solor, which came out of burning man in gerlach. the school is closing down because they do not have any kids. the economy has been based on mining. there are some tourists that come through. hunters. some of our people come through and leave money in their wake. a little town like that does not know how to make money. but they have learned in certain ways. we have made significant charitable c
evaporate by election day. in 1968, hub bert humphrey was down 15 points to richard nixon. while nixon won it was by less than 1%. in 1976, jimmy carter had a lead over gerald ford. after three debates, ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll though narrowly lost. in 1980, carter maintained a consistent advantage over ronald reagan, but the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a reagan landslide. with polls now showing president obama building a lead over mitt romney in key battleground states, a democratic pollster and consultant who worked for jimmy carter says finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others, the republicans tend to respond to these polls less than oftentimes, particularly from news organizations, less than do democrats. >> in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. gallup had michael dukakis leading by 17 points after the democratic convention, but lost to bush by 7.5%. in 1992, the incumbent president was down nine points in mid-september, tied with bill clinton by the end of octob
. >> john f. kennedy, a young senator from massachusetts, facing off against vice president richard nixon, who is known to be a fierce debater. but on screen, kennedy looks cool and calm, while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. nixon flounders under the glare of television for all four debates. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in his debate with georgia govern oor jimmy carter. >> there is no soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry, could i just -- >> the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and is blamed by many for costing ford the election. in 1980, ronald reagan is repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> but reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> four years later, president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age duri
, wonderful people ♪ >> there was good years and that years but that trend was always up. richard nixon expanded social spending. the democrats have reduced taxes as well. and everyone got a car with fins. now that is over. perhaps for a long time. the economy is growing again but slowly. the 16 trillion dollars of debt -- the university of miami is as fine of any place to contemplate the future of the nation. indeed a strong stomach for gloomy talk. >> part of the amtrak -- we do not have enough to go around. we're in a rough period. the flexibility that was felt to years ago under bush and clinton, we no longer have that cushion of our own prosperity. the battling has gone worse. absolutely. >> there will be some who point out this is still an energetic place. the energy does not come from government. it might come from the lack of it. america may be forced to find out in the years ahead. >> the british prime minister david cameron was in new york this week to reaffirm his government's goal to spend with their plans & on foreign aid. if all goes to plan, the u.k. will hit the -- to sp
entertainment tv extravaganzas. they have since the 1960 kennedy/nixon debate. it became a televised event. richard nixon won if you listened on radio, but if you saw the body language on tv, it was kennedy who won. there was a period of time there were no presidential debates. 1964, '68, '72, none. but back in 1976 these debates came on again. they can be game changers. 1980, ronald reagan was where romney was, behind in the polls. reagan came on and took on an incumbent president, jim cia why ther, performed well in the debates and the rest is history. it started him on his way to a landslide victory in 1980. >> do you think debates actually help voters decide which person to back if they're on the fence as to which direction to go? >> i think they make a difference, particularly for mitt romney. look, barack obama, whether you love him or dislike him, think he's a great leader or think he's failed, we kind of know what he's going to be like as president. we've had him for 3 1/2 years. mitt romney is still an open book. people have to say, do i want to live with this guy every day? is he
back to years ago. this picture here includes former president nixon, president chu. at time i assume you were vice president. >> yes. >> what are the circumstances of that picture? henry kisse kissinger at the to. >> that's during official visit of president nixon to vietnam. >> why were you vice president? that story about why you were vice president seems to bother you to this day. >> well, as you know, i become premier 1965. and then i brought back a stability and unity. >> before you go any further, how did you become premier? >> well, you know, from -- after the military queue against -- >> 1963. >> then from november '63 to july '65 before i become premier, during a period of time only about two years, there are five or six changes in vietnam. we begin with a military government. it last a few months, and then a mixed civilian and military government. and then few months later, go back again to military. but anyway, the last government in the south before i become premier was civilian government. that mean the chief of state, mr. shue was the civilian. the prime minister was a
a minister to the white house, as president nixon used to do, or someone to camp david, as president carter used to do? >> the answer to your question is very simple about why i don't go to church. i have gone to church regularly all my life, and i started to here in washington. and now, in the position i hold and in the world in which we live, where embassies do get blown up in beirut -- we're supposed to talk about that on the debate the 21st, i understand -- but i pose a threat to several hundred people if i go to church. i know the threats that are made against me. we all know the possibility of terrorism. we have seen the barricades that have had to be built around the white house. and, therefore, i don't feel -- and my minister knows this and supports me in this position -- i don't feel that i have a right to go to church, knowing that my being there could cause something of the kind that we have seen in other places, in beirut, for example. and i miss going to church, but i think the lord understands. [applause] >> may i ask you, please -- [applause] -- may i ask the audience please
? the answer 1960 and the famous kennedy-nixon debate. there won't be another one until gerald ford and jimmy carter until 1976. the first presidential debate coming up wednesday. as always, both sides playing the expectations game. tamping down a little bit. let me bring back maria cardona and amy holmes. amy, as you see it, who's got the advantage, president obama who's done so many, or mitt romney who frankly had to do it just to get the nomination? >> exactly. well, the president obviously has the incumbent advantage and he's been president the last four years and dealt with these issues on the front lines at 1600 pennsylvania avenue. as you mentioned, mitt romney as the gop nominee, he had to go through quite a gauntlet. i'm not sure that one person has the edge over the other. i think the question will be, you know, who gets off the best line and who's able to address the voters' concerns most directly and most pervasively. >> maria, same question. who do you think has the edge? a lot of people have been saying, mitt, where are the details? who do you think that is advantage right now?
called crises, conversation with richard nixon, president nixon says to him, you know we were close to nuclear confrontation today. now, what had changed since 1962 was that american superiority had shrunk. the russians were five years from passing us in numbers of nuclear weapons. but they already were feeling, earlier in 1970, leonid brezhnev had told the party conference in prague that by 1985 the correlation of forces will have shifted irreversibly and the soviet unions favor and we would be able to work our will. that did not prove to be much better forecast than khrushchev in 1961. it's an operational question. if one or more parties to a crisis think that it matters, and behave different as a result of changes, they matter to at minimum it raises the risk in a crisis. at maximum it occurred as the 1973, it could cause a crisis to end differently. so we look at china and we are assuming that china is not at the time of the huge military buildup, the biggest since the soviet 25 year buildup in the '60s, '70s and early '80s. china, which is unquestionably pushing a dominance in
be johnson and richard nixon, the warren commission in that meeting, lbj tells madeleine brown after tomorrow the kennedys will never embarrass me again. that is the promise. >> guest: lyndon johnson was never at the meeting you are talking about. all the times i was working -- i have been working on lyndon johnson going through any kind of his papers and diaries and letters talking to everybody who knew him i have never found a single hinge that in and johnson had anything to do with the assassination. >> host: do you find yourself answering conspiracy questions regularly? >> guest: yes. yes. my only answer is the answer i gave. i would pursue anything that i found. >> guest: >> host: a viewer wanted to do about valid stocks 13. what kind of question is that? >> guest: the ballot box with which lyndon johnson's old reelection. six days after running for the senate in 1948, six day after the election he is still behind. suddenly a ballot box from precinct, found in the desert. it contains a number of votes. if i have this right 2 in hundred two votes. interesting votes because they are writte
tube. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. because he covered some stuff up. i will be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people dead because of this and there are questions to be answered. >> andrea: it's not just republicans concerned about this. just yesterday, senate democrats also started demanding answers from the administration. greg, we're 17 days out since we learned this was a terror attack. even leon panetta said this was a terror attack. but nothing from the commander-in-chief. shouldn't he have been honest the first place? >> greg: this is confusing to me. the response is let's coordinate it, with an engineering major. if he knew it was terror, they're now say it's terror, why did you go to vegas on day one? was al-qaeda playing craps at mgm grand? catching a show at the renetian? possibly carrot top? none of them were on message. the big coup here was imprinting the idea that the video was responsible in the media and the public. is it the question that needs to be asked over and over again. where in the hell did you get your source? wher
that he gave while richard nixon continuously lost ground thereafter. the story goes that it was kennedy's tan, his youthful look that won him the first televised debate. do you think that's the full story? >> i think that's part of an lore. i think much more was this. before that first debate john kennedy was thought of as a young, not very distinguished absentee senator, junior senator from massachusetts debating against the vice-president of the united states who had stood up to kruschev. this marvelous debater. kennedy was able to not only match nixon but exceed him. people began to think of him as a possible president. >> are debates necessary for the democratic process? have the best debaters proven to be then the best presidents? >> they have in one sense. and that is one of the most important things you want from a president is someone who if he has to make a tough decision can go to americans and say, this may be unpopular with you but let me try to explain it, explain why it's the right thing to do. if a president doesn't have that he's not going to serve very well and the deba
civil rights movement, the vietnam water, watergate, nixon's resignation, the birth of earth day, the person who brought the camp david peace accord together. seminal broadcast journal. the big three. >> how did he get to be that guy?t, >> he was a good wire service reporter, and the wire service for the united press, you'd have to condense the stories. you cachet put a lot of add adverbs and add adjectives. he learned to write perfect for television with a half hour newr broadcast. the writing has to be tight and to the point. t he didn't throw lose language around. he was precise. dou >> doug, was he political? >> cronkite was a new deal democrat. >> was that known? >> no, it was not. he became a fan of franklinbeca roosevelt, cared for him as a boy growing up in the 1930s, and in the 1950s, some thought cronkite was a republican because his boss was. paley, the founder of cbs workea directly for eisenhower in world war ii, and ike loved walter cronkite. when you have thre 20th an anniversary of d-day, eisenhower took cronkite to the beaches, omaha, utah, and wandered around th
. kennedy ran for president in 1960 against nixon, his theme of that campaign is, we can do better. and he was saying basically, look, the economic growth rate is not high enough and we can have more unemployment employme country. the economic growth is higher than what it is today. by the way, ali, i have not become a democrat. what i'm saying is that i think mitt romney really needs to reach out to americans aspirations and say, look, this economy is not doing nearly as well as we want. >> how much does housing count on this? if you're part of the economy, you have a job and you've got a little money in the bank, you're moving forward, again. you're refinancing. >> or at least you feel like you're moving forward. >> how important is the housing component of this to consumer confidence? >> it's very important because one reasons why americans weren't spending over the last two or three years, as you guys know, people's wealth was falling because the value of their home, which is still, for most americans, the primary asset was falling in value. if we can see an increase in home valus and
richard nixon a long time to come out of hiding. and i'm not sure that he ever came back and spoke at a convention. >> paul glastris, author of "elephant in the room," thank you so much for your time today. it sounds like a fascinating read. full disclosure here, i have only started it. they keep me pretty busy here, paul. hope to get around to the whole thing. >> hope you enjoy it. >> coming up, what beer you drink has to say about your politics. all of a sudden, the folks here on the floor have all perked up. >>> a little bit later, accusations politics in missouri have become unladylike. this is msnbc. [ male announcer ] let's say you need to take care of legal matters. wouldn't it be nice if there was an easier, less-expensive option than using a traditional lawyer? well, legalzoom came up with a better way. we took the best of the old and combined it with modern technology. together you get quality services on your terms, with total customer support. legalzoom documents have been accepted in all 50 states, and they're backed by a 100% satisfaction guarantee. so go to legalzoom
economy. gordon nixon, president and ceo of the royal bank of canada, moderated this 40-minute discussion. >> good morning, lloyd. >> good morning. >> this is a new job for me, maybe a second career. i feel very powerful. [laughter] >> you are very powerful, that's why. [laughter] >> i feel much more powerful as a journalist than as i do as an asker of questions. delighted to have you here in canada, and i know the audience is very much looking forward to your perspective on what's going on around the world and what's going on in the financial services industry which is facing challenges, but i thought we'd start with your views on the global economy, and perhaps you could start up and make your way around the world and what you see in growth and more importantly, what are the challenges out there that we're all going to have to deal with over the next period of time? >> well, there's not enough time for all the challenges, but i'll give perspective. listen, let me give away the punch line.ñno the punch line is, i think, you know, on world basis, this is, you know, the world's not going
that late september leads can evaporate by election day. in 1968 hubert humphrey was down 15 points. nixon won it was less than 1 percent. in 1976, jimmy carter had a 33-point lead over gerald ford. three debates, ford had cut the lead to 5 points and led in the final polls and narrowly lost. jamie carter had a consistent advantage over ronald reagan but the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a reagan landslide. now he is building a lead in key battleground states, a consultant who worked for jimmy carter, finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from exit polls that republicans tend to respond to these polls less than oftentimes particularly to news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in. >> julie: 8 there was a huge swing. dukakis lost to bush. in 1992 incumbent president was down nine points in mid-september and was tied with bill clinton by the end of october. the clinton eventually won. former clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level
, and as a student of history, this campaign is a lot like the 1960 race between kennedy and nixon. it is like the campaigns in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year v
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)